Atlanta Leaders Unite for ADL Awards
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Atlanta Leaders Unite for ADL Awards

Judith and Mark Taylor were recipients of the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award at the Anti-Defamation League “Community of Respect” event on Nov. 14.

After 35 years with the Atlanta newspapers, Marcia currently serves as Retail VP for the Buckhead Business Association, where she delivers news and trends (laced with a little gossip). On the side, Marcia is Captain of the Senior Cheerleaders for the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

  • Doug Shipman, Judith and Mark Taylor were honored by the ADL last week.
    Doug Shipman, Judith and Mark Taylor were honored by the ADL last week.
  • Left, Gail Goldstein Heyman, was thrilled that the Taylors (Judith, shown here, center) received the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award.
    Left, Gail Goldstein Heyman, was thrilled that the Taylors (Judith, shown here, center) received the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award.
  • At the ADL reception were Sandra Gordy Massell, Sam Massell, Bobby Goldstein and Elliott Levitas.
    At the ADL reception were Sandra Gordy Massell, Sam Massell, Bobby Goldstein and Elliott Levitas.
  • Family and friends came to honor the Taylors. From left, Chuck Taylor, Lisa Cannon Taylor, Elaine Alexander and Miles Alexander.
    Family and friends came to honor the Taylors. From left, Chuck Taylor, Lisa Cannon Taylor, Elaine Alexander and Miles Alexander.

Drizzling rain didn’t put a damper on the nearly 450 attendees at the Anti-Defamation League “Community of Respect” event at the Atlanta History Center Nov. 14. Leaders, including many beyond the Jewish community, came to recognize Judith and Mark Taylor, the recipients of the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award.

This year was especially poignant because, according to ADL Honorary Board Member Gail Goldstein Heyman, this is the last year the award will be so-named. It is being discontinued, but a new direction is yet to be announced.

“We are delighted to honor the Taylors, who knew my grandfather, Abe. We do think this is the last generation to have experienced his legacy first hand.”

Joshua Taylor-Klauss, grandson of the Taylors and a senior at The Paideia School, spoke fondly of his grandparents during the cocktail reception. “I am fortunate to have grown up around my grandparents’ stimulating dinner-table conversations, as they have shown me the world. More importantly, they set the example for kindness and giving.”

In other honors, Doug Shipman, president and CEO of the Woodruff Arts Center, received the Stuart Lewengrub Torch of Liberty Award. It was announced by a previous winner, former Mayor Shirley Franklin.

Former Mayor Sam Massell said about the organization that fights hate, “I rely on the ADL to protect me and those to whom I feel close, as well as the community as a whole.”

At the ADL reception were Sandra Gordy Massell, Sam Massell, Bobby Goldstein and Elliott Levitas.

Stressing the importance of helping ADL fulfill its mission was Frank McClosky, a retired Georgia Power executive, ADL board member and past president of the Buckhead Business Association. “We cannot do it alone. We must strive to instantly stop hate against anyone – now more than ever.”

During the program in the history center’s Grand Overlook ballroom, ADL Southeast Regional Director Allison Padilla-Goodman acknowledged a 17 percent jump in hate crimes. She was pleased to announce that just the previous night, a hate crime ordinance was passed in Charleston, S.C.

Family and friends came to honor the Taylors. From left, Chuck Taylor, Lisa Cannon Taylor, Elaine Alexander and Miles Alexander.

Marifred Cilella, head of The Howard School, told of the school’s mission to teach about the nuances of words, that there is No Place for Hate® – an ADL school initiative – and that students should be “upstanders, not bystanders.”

Frederic Bloch, ADL senior vice president of growth, flew in for this special night from the national headquarters in New York. In his remarks, he stated, “We need to get hate off the internet … The ADL stands as a bulwark against hate and rhetoric over reason.”

Son of the honorees, Chuck Taylor, told of his father’s quiet way of supporting numerous causes, … from Planned Parenthood to the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum. With the heartiest laugh of the night, he described Mark Taylor’s “alter cocker snow ski trip, where he goes down the slopes at age 90 – and still flies a plane, albeit with a copilot.”

Left, Gail Goldstein Heyman, was thrilled that the Taylors (Judith, shown here, center) received the Abe Goldstein Human Relations Award.

Honoree Mark Taylor took the podium to describe how, in his father’s era, the Leo Frank case jolted Jews “who thought they were safe.” He continued, “It’s hard to know where the mainstream starts and the fringe ends.” Judith Taylor quoted a song from “South Pacific” about hate: “‘You have to be carefully taught’ … sometimes the pendulum does not swing and is a spiral.” And “Let’s remember the Bible, where the stranger is welcomed.”

Shipman gave the rousing final remarks, “I have seen people change, … evidence of the impact of ADL.” He recited some stanzas from the spiritual, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around, I’m gonna keep on walking.”

ADL Board Chairman Phil Rubin closed out the evening, thanking guests for their support, and remarking how incredible the response has been for these important leaders and for the ADL.

Elaine and Miles Alexander, Rick Williams and Janet Lavine served as the tribute co-chairs. Lauren Estrin and Eric Fisher served as host committee co-chairs. 

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