Designer Struts a New Generation
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ArtsChai Style Homes

Designer Struts a New Generation

Take a look inside the modern home of designer Candice Keilin.

After 35 years with the Atlanta newspapers, Marcia currently serves as Retail VP for the Buckhead Business Association, where she delivers news and trends (laced with a little gossip).

  • Photos by Duane Stork // Designer Candice Keilin poses with Duchess Madison of Briarcliff.  The organic cubes afoot are acrylic resin made of tree bark.
    Photos by Duane Stork // Designer Candice Keilin poses with Duchess Madison of Briarcliff. The organic cubes afoot are acrylic resin made of tree bark.
  • The master bedroom expands Keilin’s metallic theme with a special note of the crushed glass art from Israel above the bed.
    The master bedroom expands Keilin’s metallic theme with a special note of the crushed glass art from Israel above the bed.
  • The lower level conversation pit features the white tires redesigned in South Africa to benefit women in need.
    The lower level conversation pit features the white tires redesigned in South Africa to benefit women in need.
  • Duchess patrols the infinity pool where the Keilins recently hosted a Maccabi event for 110.
    Duchess patrols the infinity pool where the Keilins recently hosted a Maccabi event for 110.

Interior designer Candice Keilin provides a window into her Sandy Springs home, which is a testament to her scope and ambition to be textured, tonal and timeless.

“Our home is contemporary casual and not meant to be a museum. I’ve used new, but traditional ways to update so we can keep our handed-down treasured pieces giving the home a warm but modern feel.”

Keilin’s design practice includes commercial jobs such as apartment clubhouses, model homes, public spaces, work/offices, residential new home designs, and renovations, which include amazing wine cellars, kitchens and bathrooms. “Here I’m into mixing metals, updated with silver, gold and textures. … Art is very personal; there is no wrong way. We can be as creative as the client wants. Texture and layers complete art.”

Candice Keilin with Duchess Madison

Keilin’s talent is to integrate glamour with the insight into how we want to raise children or live our dream lives. Her kitchen accessories, art projects, small toys and pieces, and hobbies are all hidden charmingly behind view. Using South Africa as a backdrop, she combines Carrera marble, crushed glass, over-the-top dramatic (often floating) lighting, Zuo Modern pieces, local festival finds and unusual use of tile to not be shy about making her statement. And there is always room in the 8,100 square feet for curious Duchess Madison of Briarcliff, a ruby Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

Experience the exuberance.

Jaffe: What are some of the most unusual collections you have?

Esteban Patino’s conversation piece “Think Before You Speak” welcomes guests from the foyer. The two white vertical paintings are by Villanueva.

Keilin: In the entrance we have Esteban Patino’s diptych treatment of language and dimensional conversation, “Think Before You Speak.” His work is at the High Museum and the Atlanta airport. He is local and developed his own alphabet. His morphed objects are Salvador Dali-like.

The ivory teardrop oval sculpture is from Laguna, Calif., Hearst Castle and made with horsehair.

I utilize a treatment of pulverized alabaster-like cane that we use in the upstairs loge, behind the lower level bar and in the powder room. In the front hall we have four hammered metal plates from India. It’s certainly internationally flavored.

Jaffe: You’re known for your forward-thinking kitchen designs.

Keilin: It’s important to mention that my home was built seven years ago. I was on the cutting edge by using Cambria and installing a waterfall edge when most kitchens didn’t have these elements, nor did many installers know what that was or how to create it.

The Keilin kitchen features drum lighting from Lighting Loft; appliances are hidden behind cut out mirrored cabinets. A seeded glass table tops a Storehouse metal base.

The kitchen cabinets are my custom designs with antique mirror inlaid into the door design. I didn’t want to see a lot of clutter, and utilized my counter space behind secret doors, hiding everyday items like the toaster and tea kettle. Today when I design kitchens, I use this original concept and create entire hidden coffee stations behind full overlay door pantry systems. It’s my number one favorite “go to.” I think every kitchen should have this.

Our banquette is faux leather NappaTile, which was used in Mercedes-Benz Stadium on the ceilings and walls, in keeping with the silver metallic, but durable theme. I also like my South African Carrol Boyes pieces that are both functional and utilitarian.

Jaffe: You are a tile expert.

Keilin: Soon my line Kebo will be sold out of ADAC design center here as well as nationwide. Kebo, which I designed together with my sister Narissa Bonnet (Ke ilin/ Bonnet), will include some unusual textures and combinations of material, … fun, creative, yet practical.

We will have faux leather tiles with an enormous library of fabrics and combination of patterns to be used both functionally for sound reduction and practically like I did as a cushioned seat/headboard or seating I made for the Opera nightclub. … The choices are endless.

Jaffe: Your lighting is quite special.

View of the dining room lighting from the top floor.

Keilin: Like many Atlanta homes, I have several pieces by Yaacov Golan’s Lighting Loft. The most dramatic are the Italian entrance hall pieces; and then the dining room had to be designed by myself. The biggest challenge was the dining room needing light at the table and being anchored on the ceiling 19 feet above, which creates a dramatic cascade of light.

Jaffe: How do you use the outdoors?

Keilin: We enjoy sharing the out back space for community events. We recently hosted Family Night for the Maccabi games for 110. Fun for all with an in-ground trampoline, putting green and infinity edge pool. The lounging areas are South Beach flavored.

Jaffe: With two active children, share some design tips.

Keilin: We have tons of Lego, Harry Potter, ballet dancers, soccer, art projects and even my own original Barbie dollhouse. Much is built into the design of their bedrooms; but we also have a music/art room that’s pretty messy. To balance that, I designed orange and gray square panels that toys can be sheltered behind that keep them out of site yet accessible. We have castles, moats, paint, clay and easels.

Jaffe: What in your home reflects your South African roots?

Keilin: The Do Re Mi sculptures in the entrance hall are by South African artist Roelna Louw Bashew. The glass art in the formal living space is by Janet McGregor Dunn.

The triptych of crushed glass over the master bed is by South African artist Brenda Brett living in Netanya, Israel. I had them custom-made and ordered for a very special client here.

We have a very unusual redesigned rubber tire as a cocktail table whose sales benefit South African women.

Our TV family room opens onto the covered patio, one-level entertainment space that is reminiscent of South African style. Our limestone surface walls may be more Israeli than South African. I like the effect.

We cover the globe, … the clocks in the lower level display the time in Tokyo, London, Paris and New York!

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