Chai Style Art: Biz Mogul Power Couple Inspire Leadership and Glamour
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Chai Style Art: Biz Mogul Power Couple Inspire Leadership and Glamour

Linda and Mark Silberman's Sandy Springs home serves as a luxurious sanctuary with tons of personality to fit their lifestyle.

After 35 years with the Atlanta newspapers, Marcia currently serves as Retail VP for the Buckhead Business Association, where she delivers news and trends (laced with a little gossip). On the side, Marcia is Captain of the Senior Cheerleaders for the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

  • Photos by Heidi Morton // Linda and Mark Silberman relax by the crackled glass bar in front of their first painting, “Hansen,” by Amy Ringholz. The light fixture, top left, is from Yaacov Golan’s Lighting Loft.
    Photos by Heidi Morton // Linda and Mark Silberman relax by the crackled glass bar in front of their first painting, “Hansen,” by Amy Ringholz. The light fixture, top left, is from Yaacov Golan’s Lighting Loft.
  • Linda’s art studio is grounded on stone with a bounty of natural light.
    Linda’s art studio is grounded on stone with a bounty of natural light.
  • Mark’s favorite piece is a Murano glass woman by Alexis Silk, known for her freehand sculpture of human anatomies. Mark liked the lighting, shape and amber hue.
    Mark’s favorite piece is a Murano glass woman by Alexis Silk, known for her freehand sculpture of human anatomies. Mark liked the lighting, shape and amber hue.
  • The Silbermans turn a page every day in this massive 476-page book of Annie Leibovitz’s photography by Taschen. The intense aquamarine and teal paintings are by Rocky Hawkins (2008).
    The Silbermans turn a page every day in this massive 476-page book of Annie Leibovitz’s photography by Taschen. The intense aquamarine and teal paintings are by Rocky Hawkins (2008).
  • Linda’s mother owned this original Miro block print “Untitled.”
    Linda’s mother owned this original Miro block print “Untitled.”
  • The Silbermans commissioned this burnt wood table for the kitchen nook. The dramatic chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries.
    The Silbermans commissioned this burnt wood table for the kitchen nook. The dramatic chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries.
  • Linda’s floral paintings adorn the walls. Above the fireplace sits DeVary’s giclee painting, “A Cowboys Dream.”
The Calder “Untitled,” inherited from Linda’s mother, is beyond the dining room.
    Linda’s floral paintings adorn the walls. Above the fireplace sits DeVary’s giclee painting, “A Cowboys Dream.” The Calder “Untitled,” inherited from Linda’s mother, is beyond the dining room.

Linda and Mark Silberman have stepped up, concurrently, to keep our community viable and relevant as top-tier leadership volunteers for the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.

Mark heads RefrigiWear, the market niche leader for quality cold weather gear and active wear, more specifically, gloves, headwear, footwear and insulated clothing for industry workers and athletes exposed to freezing temperatures.

They relax at home among Western art and Linda’s own colorful paintings. Their Sandy Springs home serves as a luxurious sanctuary with tons of personality that fits their lifestyle, interspersed with Miro, Matisse, Madonna, and Mark’s memories of Tonto. Bouquets of flowers, both fresh and recreated, portend the Hollywood alabaster glamour of the “wow” master bedroom.

Linda recalled, “We moved here 11 years ago from Crabapple, which seemed, at the time, like the Land of Oz.”

Read about their purposeful lives and surroundings.

Aussie poodle, Dexter, enjoys the spotlight under the glamorous tray ceiling and chandelier by Circa Lighting in the master bedroom.

Marcia: How has being chairman of the board of the Federation impacted you and vice versa?

Mark: It is a two-year commitment for which I was well-prepared, having worked in the Federation system for 10 years. I knew I would, at some point, take a leadership role. This is working with 29 board members and the CEO. I am fortunate that my family and business partner is running the day-to-day operations of RefrigiWear to allow me the time to insert myself wholeheartedly in the Jewish world.

We recently returned from the General Assembly Federation Mission to Israel, which was an inspiring confluence of Jews from all over the world (1,200 from North America plus 1,000 Israelis).  We toured the new five-story “Start Up Nation” technology repurposed building, as well as the Knesset, where we discussed Israel’s relationship with the Diaspora. We were the first group to visit the U.S. Embassy with Ambassador David Friedman in a private ceremony.

The Silbermans commissioned this burnt wood table for the kitchen nook. The dramatic chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries.

Linda: We enjoyed the beach, food, and cosmopolitan flair in Tel Aviv, too, and the new Sarona Market (similar to our Ponce City Market) in Jerusalem. Let me add that at the Embassy visit, there was such tight security that we could bring only our passports — no cell phone, no purse.

Marcia: Elaborate on your mission as chair of Women’s Philanthropy, a three-year commitment.

Linda: We focus on engaging different sectors of women in new ways. We are doing a series of pop-ups, like visiting the Ben Massell Dental Clinic, the Breman Museum, InterfaithFamily, Jewish Fertility Foundation, and more. We want to appeal to all age groups and show the amazing work of Federation. We also had a fabulous mission to Cuba this past spring.

Mark’s favorite piece is a Murano glass woman by Alexis Silk, known for her freehand sculpture of human anatomies. Mark liked the lighting, shape and amber hue.

Marcia: What are some of the most unusual pieces you have collected?

Mark: I saw the Alexis Silk gold glass figure in someone’s office and had to have it. I was fascinated that it was made from one piece of Murano glass. Silk is at the frontier of the conceptual expression of figurative glass in the human form. She created it freehand while the glass is hot without a mold.

I lean towards Western art. When I have a cocktail here at the bar, “The Race at Waldo Canyon” by David Bradley, amuses me by conjuring up Tonto racing his horse. The Amy Ringholz “Hansen” (Jackson Hole, Wyo.) is the first piece we bought as a couple.

Former real estate developer Barry Henderson’s first bronze was this “Silent Warrior.” Mark grabbed it as an early investment.

The “Silent Warrior” bronze might be my most prized as it was the first piece done by Barry Henderson, a real estate developer who transitioned into sculptor. Let’s just say it has appreciated in value.

DeVary’s “Woman with the Orange Flower,” far left, balances Linda’s “Magic Horse.” The vases in the center are from Spin Ceramics, a boutique in Soho.

Linda: In the contemporary Western vein, we collect David DeVary, who has work displayed at the Booth Western Art Museum. We met him in Sante Fe, N.M., and liked that he creates portraits, but holds back the full-face view, usually the eyes. On the one in the living room entrance, he added an orange flower to the cowboy hat to make it special for us. He declared, “Something is missing,” before we walked out with it.

Linda’s mother owned this original Miro block print “Untitled.”

Sentimentally, we blended in my mother’s collection of a Calder, Miro, and Matisse.

This nontraditional Madonna acrylic dominates the entrance to the lower level.

“Madonna,” in the lower-level rec room, is wild and unexpected for us.

Marcia: Linda, what inspires you to paint?

Linda blends oil and acrylic to create bold flowers and interpretations of horses. This piece in the family room is “Scarlet Blooms.”

Linda: Here you see my intense bold flowers. I originally started with oil, then changed to acrylics or a combination of both.  I also paint horses, which is spiritual for me as I lost a very dear family member who loved horses. That somehow helps me channel her.

Linda’s art studio is grounded on stone with a bounty of natural light.

Marcia: How do you use your home to entertain?

Linda: We make tons of pizza in the outdoor oven and salads to serve around the pool. We are very casual. We reconstructed the pool to include Pebble Tec and a shallow ledge.

The Silbermans entertain casually outdoors using the commercial pizza oven for friends and family
The Silbermans turn a page every day in this massive 476-page book of Annie Leibovitz’s photography by Taschen. The intense aquamarine and teal paintings are by Rocky Hawkins (2008).

The dining room seats 16. The black velvet fabric contrasts the white vases on the table top.

The round eat “in kitchen” table is custom constructed of burnt wood. The chandelier is from B.D. Jeffries.

Marcia: Last word.

Mark: Remember our Federation is not only about donations, but touching people by keeping our Jewish community viable and relevant. In terms of accepting a demanding leadership role (laughing), it’s sometimes about who asks you to volunteer.

And, in terms of art, I’d say, ‘Never meet the artist, as you’ll always end up buying the art!’

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