The Union for Reform Judaism has unveiled its newest specialty camp and is accepting applications for the summer.

The 18th camp within the URJ umbrella is the 6 Points Creative Arts Academy, which will serve campers from Atlanta and the rest of the country in West Chester, Pa. Like other specialty camps, the Creative Arts Academy will offer campers a range of creative options.

Culinary arts, dance, theater, vocal music, instrumental music and visual arts are majors campers can choose to concentrate on during the summer. Campers will choose one or two of the majors, depending on their age, then spend the rest of the day taking electives and participating in more traditional camp activities, including team and individual sports.

Campers also can participate in farming because the academy has an organic farm on site. The farm will produce about 70 percent of the camp’s produce.

Current third- to 10th-graders are eligible to attend the Creative Arts Academy, which offers three sessions, each just under two weeks long:

  • June 26 to July 8.
  • July 10 to July 22.
  • July 24 to Aug. 5.

The Creative Arts Academy commissioned a boarding school, the Westtown School, for the summer, so all rooms are dorm-style. Campers will have access to the Westtown theater, three art studios, a kitchen for culinary arts, two music rooms for vocal and instrumental instruction, and several individual practice rooms.

Kara Hoffman, the assistant director of the Creative Arts Academy, emphasized campers’ desire to grow in their chosen creative areas.

“At 6 Points Creative Arts Academy, everyone works together to create a living laboratory for learning, performing and growing, informed and inspired by Jewish values and tradition,” she said. “Mentored by the best in their field, young artists are drawn together in a dynamic community to experience camp, explore their passions, and improve their skills in culinary arts, dance, instrumental or vocal music, theater, and visual arts.”

The Westtown School main building houses the dorms and dining hall.

More than 100 campers have registered for the camp’s first year. Many are coming from other URJ specialty camps.

“We’re looking forward to building an identity within Judaism and building a connection to Israel,” Hoffman said. “These short sessions have helped because kids are busy, and to only commit to a two- or four-week session allows children to do multiple things during the summer.

“We’re excited for these campers. It’s going to be a great summer.”