It is all about the nose … and the face … and women’s beauty.

Using interviews and photographs of several women, “Take My Nose … Please!” explores the often-conflicted decisions to change and improve faces through plastic surgery. The documentary delves into the deep feelings women have about looking ethnic, looking old, looking their best and feeling good about themselves.

Humorous clips of famous women who broke the taboo and championed the “work they had done” are shared. Phyllis Diller, Roseanne Barr, Cher and Joan Rivers are among the many who chat about their decisions, their right to make facial changes and the effects those decisions have on their lives.

Seeing before and after photos of stars we know and love is appealing.

This documentary informs us of the history of cosmetic surgery, which seems to have begun in earnest in the 1920s when singer and actress Fanny Brice, who described herself as a bagel amongst white bread, went public with her nose job.

Following the story of two female performers, we are exposed to the world of plastic surgery and the complicated decision-making. What may interest some viewers is how doctors, during office consultations, are able to generate real-time computer images of how their patients will look after surgery.

Happily, the stigma of plastic surgery seems to have greatly diminished, and women feel ever freer to look their best.

Those who have a keen interest in nose jobs, face-lifts and the like or perhaps are contemplating a procedure may find the 99 minutes of this discussion fascinating. For the rest of us, it is at least an hour too long.

(Atlanta Jewish Film Festival screening: Jan. 26, 11:30 a.m., Perimeter Pointe; Feb. 4, 2 p.m., Tara; Feb. 5, 7 p.m., Springs; Feb. 7, 11:40 a.m., Tara; Feb. 11, 1:25 p.m., Springs)