By Al Shams

Felix Prinzo was seeking a volunteer activity for his granddaughter back in the spring when he noticed a newspaper article about the Packaged Good, a new nonprofit organization in Dunwoody that is dedicated to helping youths give back to the community.

Child-decorated bags at the Packaged Good await their turn to be filled with necessities and delivered by Felix Prinzo.

Child-decorated bags at the Packaged Good await their turn to be filled with necessities and delivered by Felix Prinzo.

Thinking it would be a great activity for the girl, the 77-year-old Dunwoody retiree joined his granddaughter for her volunteer effort. He could not sit idly by, so he stacked boxes and cleaned.

Sally Mundell, who founded the Packaged Good as a way for her daughters and others to learn to empower their lives by performing good deeds, soon enlisted Prinzo to make deliveries for the nonprofit organization.

Children at the Packaged Good decorate gift bags, which are filled with donated products needed by people such as the elderly, veterans and shelter residents.

When I visited the Package Good, I saw approximately 50 children decorating and filling bags for the Community Assistance Center.

I talked to four Davis Academy students: Shayna Edelman, Abbi Meyers, Ava Wilensky and Gabbi Swartz. They are bright, energetic, confident young women who enjoyed the volunteer experience and said the Packaged Good lets them apply values they learn in school.

Other recipients of the bags include Rainbow Village, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, the Zaban Tower and Hugs for Soldiers. Prinzo’s volunteerism solves the problem of how to get the gift bags to those destinations. He has delivered more than 6,000 of them.

Davis Academy students say the Packaged Good helps them put into action what they learn at school about mitzvot.

Davis Academy students say the Packaged Good helps them put into action what they learn at school about mitzvot.

Prinzo is a Pittsburgh native who earned a college degree in accounting and finance. After working for U.S. Steel in the 1960s, he moved to the Atlanta area in mid-1970s. Since his retirement in 1996, the father of two and grandfather of five has spent much of his free time on charitable activities.

He’s also so humble that while he was willing to talk to the AJT, he refused to have his photo taken.

Angels Among Us

Many people in our community make special contributions to the common good. While some of them have high profiles and receive much recognition, others are unsung heroes. This occasion series intends to bring them the notice they deserve. Send suggestions for Angels Among Us to editor@atljewishtimes.com.