Marion R. Sobelson died March 24, 2013, just a few days shy of her 91st birthday.

CandleShe was born in 1922 in Indianapolis and moved to Atlanta as a teenager. She graduated from Girls’ High and thereafter attended the Marjorie Webster Junior College in Washington, D.C. She was confirmed at The Temple, for which she maintained a lifelong love, dedication and membership.

Marion was a lifelong volunteer. During World War II, she worked for the Red Cross. In later years, she served as a mentor and reader to children, taught English to Jewish Russian immigrants and served meals to the homeless at the Zaban Shelter. Independent, ambitious and entrepreneurial, Marion enjoyed a lengthy career as a real estate agent and broker, most recently at Harry Norman Realtors.

In 1958, long before the advent of disposable diapers, Marion envisioned, designed and patented a stretchable, absorbent cloth diaper. She was a patriotic and astute follower of politics and never missed a debate or an election. She was a voracious reader and an accomplished bridge player, and she never tired of learning new things.

In her last months of life, she learned to play pinochle with her circle of new friends at Huntcliff Summit, where she lived for the past year and a half. She enjoyed painting, sewing, working with stained glass and Braves baseball.

Even with a career, Marion’s pride and joy was her family. She was predeceased in 1996 by her adored and adoring husband, Dr. Bert Sobelson, whom she lovingly remembered as “the handsomest man in Atlanta.” She is survived by her sister, Harriet Frankel, as well as three children and their spouses, Elaine Rubin, Roy and Bonnie Sobelson, and Paula and Roy Swartzberg; six grandchildren and their spouses, Larry and Gidgette Rubin, Kim Rubin, Jared and Robyn Sobelson, Bari and Daryn Snipes, Adam Swartzberg and Emily Thornton, and Jenna Swartzberg; and four great-grandchildren, Lexi and Nikki Rubin, Devin Rubin, and Braxton Snipes.

Graveside services were held at noon on Mon., March 25, 2013 at Crest Lawn Memorial Park, 2000 Marietta Boulevard. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to The Temple, 1589 Peachtree St., Atlanta, GA 30309, the-temple.org, or to any organization that supports the search for a cure for Parkinson’s Disease. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care.