Rosh Chodesh Sivan began Tuesday, May 15. During Sivan, we celebrate the wheat harvest in Israel and observe Shavuot, with all-night Torah study, dairy food and the reading of the Book of Ruth.

This month’s powerful new moon is in Taurus, which Uranus entered for the first time since June 1934. This points to many changes ahead. Astrologers suggest that unexpected things will occur, with greater revelations forthcoming.

During Sivan we turn our awareness to the layers in the universe. We’re at the middle realm on Earth, striving to express the yetzer tov, or inclination to goodness. Then there’s the lowest level, containing the negative vibration of the yetzer hara, the inclination to evil.

The astrologers are urging us to slow down and be mindful of the changes in the world. Our best defense is to remain present and flexible, accepting these changes. Apparently, we’re on the verge of such transformation that the world will operate as it never has before, much like when we entered the technology era.

We couldn’t imagine life the way it is now. Cellphones weren’t a thing, but now, who can be without one? Smart houses are real.

According to a New York astrologer, Uranus rules “the Internet, television, radio, social media, progressive ideals, human rights and the field of astrology itself.”

The traditional ways are set to become relics of the past. The lyrics of the John Lennon song “Imagine” keep swirling in my head.

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace

You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man.

Sivan’s layers are referenced here as heaven above and hell below, with the people in the middle, living peacefully. As Jews, we can easily imagine no heaven and no hell, but peace? That’s a difficult one.

Also, no religion? If anything, I find it imperative to connect with our Judaism more than ever. Its ancient wisdom goes beyond religion and encompasses psychology, sociology, astrology, numerology and sacred geometry, right down to the double inverted triangles that make up the Star of David.

Our task during Sivan is to embrace the divine and make it manifest on Earth. How do we do that? One astrologer echoed that we must “slow down and pay attention. It’s not a good time to zip around.”

I laughed out loud at that because I recently sustained an injury when I slipped on wet grass during one of those storms. I’ve been crutching along in a boot, unable to zip around, which has definitely slowed me down.

According to the Book of Formation, Sivan is associated with the sense of walking, with the left foot being the controlling limb. It’s my left foot that’s healing, which is the feminine side of our circuitry.

Women are in the news, finally being heard and having a leg to stand on. The #MeToo movement has gathered its forces and is moving forward. Maybe some justice being served is one way to see G-d manifest in earthly issues.

We seem to be in a period of re-examination of everything that gets our time and attention. We’re being called to stop running around and unconsciously doing what we’ve always done out of habit. It’s time to consciously focus on what matters to us, accept change and adjust accordingly.

Meditation focus: Quiet yourself and consider what gets your energy. Do these things feed your soul, or are they forced? If you were a dreamer, what would you imagine a changed world would look like for you?