Wednesday, Feb. 15, is the deadline to apply for grants from Atlanta’s Jewish Fertility Foundation.

Each grant covers the costs of a cycle of in vitro fertilization treatments, with the foundation paying the fertility clinic directly. The grant does not cover testing before the IVF cycle, pre-implantation genetic testing, medications, egg or sperm donations, or surrogacy charges.

Among the eligibility requirements for applicants: At least one parent must be Jewish; the parents must intend to raise the child as Jewish; and the woman must be a nonsmoker age 37 or younger.

You can download an application from the JFF website (www.jewishfertilityfoundation.org) but cannot submit it electronically. The application must be received at the foundation’s Dunwoody office by Feb. 15, not postmarked by that date, and it includes forms that must be filled out and signed by a doctor or nurse. So take the time required into account.

Elana Bekerman Frank founded JFF late in 2015, and it spent 2016 fundraising, holding educational sessions and gaining 501(c)(3) nonprofit status before launching its first grant cycle.

Contact Frank at elana@jewishfertilityfoundation.org for more information.

Schuchat in Charge at CDC

The inauguration of President Donald Trump brought the end of Thomas Frieden’s 7½-year run as the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but a Jewish physician is still in charge of the federal agency on Clifton Road near Emory University.

When Frieden resigned Jan. 20 after the longest run as director in 40 years, he was succeeded on a temporary basis by Anne Schuchat, a respected veteran of the U.S. Public Health Service who holds the rank of rear admiral in that service.

Jeffrey Koplan, a former CDC director who heads Emory University’s global health initiatives, told The Huffington Post that Schuchat is highly skilled and talented and does superb work.

She joined the CDC in 1988 as one of the people who went into the field to investigate disease outbreaks. She led the CDC response to the flu pandemic in 2009 and the SARS outbreak in Beijing in 2003, and played a part in responding to the anthrax attacks in 2001, according to the CDC.

A graduate of Swarthmore and Dartmouth’s medical school, she has been the author or co-author of more than 230 scientific articles, book chapters and reviews. She has been a member of the National Academy of Medicine since 2008.

She’s the interim director until a health and human services secretary is in place in Trump’s Cabinet and chooses a new director. Georgia Republican Congressman Tom Price is awaiting a Senate confirmation vote on his nomination as health secretary.

It’s rare for an interim CDC director to get the job on a permanent basis, but it happened with Julie Gerberding when she succeeded Koplan in 2002.

New Head at Duluth Chiropractic

Steven Sommer recently took over the practice of Duluth Chiropractic and Wellness Center, combining the latest technologies with natural, evidence-based chiropractic care at 3499 Duluth Park Lane, Suite 110.

Steven Sommer

Sommer uses the Space Foundation-certified Insight Millennium Technology, which enables chiropractors to establish a reliable, multidimensional representation of a patient’s condition and to help the patient understand the underlying principles of chiropractic and appreciate the wellness benefits of long-term treatment.

“This tool is vital for checking the integrity of your nervous system,” Sommer said, “and finding the underlying root cause of your health issues.”

Sommer got his chiropractic Degree from Life University and is board certified by the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners. He provided chiropractic services with the Chiropractic & Sports Injury of Atlanta practice and Tucker Chiropractic before taking over the Duluth Chiropractic and Wellness Center when Gary Martin retired.

“Dr. Martin has been a resource for healing the community for years,” Sommer said. “I am proud to be following in his footsteps.”

For more information, visit duluthchiropractic.com.