The Women’s Caucus for Art of Georgia is responding to the problem of human trafficking with an exhibition called “46/21: 46 Million Slaves — 21st Century Slavery.”

“We are artists speaking out. We seek to end human trafficking. We witness the injustice of slavery. We raise awareness to achieve the joy of rescue, of freedom,” said Callahan McDonough, who chairs the artist organization’s Art+Activism Initiative, which is creating and sponsoring the exhibit.

Margee Bright-Ragland’s “Wounded Angel” collage is one of seven mixed-media works represent the seven days of the week when human trafficking takes place, are part of an art exhibition at the Mammal Gallery from Sept. 10 to Oct. 2 called “46/21: 46 Million Slaves — 21st Century Slavery.”

Margee Bright-Ragland’s “Wounded Angel” collage is part of an exhibition at the Mammal Gallery from Sept. 10 to Oct. 2 called “46/21: 46 Million Slaves — 21st Century Slavery.”

The committee planning “46/21” includes Temple Kol Emeth member Maxine Hess and Ahavath Achim Synagogue member Flora Rosefsky, both of whom are among the 57 visual artists who so far have contributed work to the show at Atlanta’s Mammal Gallery at 91 Broad St.

The exhibit is scheduled for Sept. 10 to Oct. 2, with public hours from noon to 6 p.m. from Thursday through Saturday during that period.

The exhibit opening Saturday, Sept. 10, features a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. and a collaborative performance of artist Molly Gochman’s sidewalk Red Sand Project.

The show also will include a panel discussion on human trafficking at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17, to be followed by a performance by Maggie Benoit and Max Beeching, and an artist talk and performance by Ruth Showalter at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25.

Judge Shondeana Crews-Morris will facilitate the panel discussion among Anna Blau of International Women’s House; Irina Khasin, the head of the human trafficking unit at the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office; Dalia Racine, the head of the human trafficking unit at the DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office; and Jennifer Swain, the deputy director of youthSpark.

The exhibit and its related events are free and open to the public.