Ten winners from the North Atlanta Jewish Students Technology Fair went on to place in the top three at the Georgia Educational Technology Fair on March 5 in Macon.

The nearly 70 students who qualified for the state competition from the North Atlanta Jewish event in January were allowed to submit their projects on video so they could avoid violating Shabbat.

The Epstein School’s (from left) Gavin Brown, Shai Bachar and Dylan Wendt placed in the top three in their categories at the Georgia Educational Technology Fair.

The Epstein School’s (from left) Gavin Brown, Shai Bachar and Dylan Wendt placed in the top three in their categories at the Georgia Educational Technology Fair.

The Epstein School’s Shai Bachar was the only qualifier from the North Atlanta Jewish Tech Fair to finish first in the state, capturing the title for third- and fourth-graders in device modification.

Fellow Epstein students Gavin Brown and Dylan Wendt finished third among fifth- and sixth-graders for their project in device modification.

Atlanta Jewish Academy’s Dan Jutan placed second in the tech programming challenge for high school juniors and seniors.

Two students, the Davis Academy’s Jordan Liban among seventh- and eighth-graders and the Weber School’s Josh Glass for ninth- and 10th-graders, finished second in their age groups in game design.

Liban and Davis classmate Jake Friedman’s 3D modeling project earned third place among seventh- and eighth-graders.

Charlie Berss from Davis finished third among third- and fourth-graders in 3D modeling.

Shaun Regenbaum of Atlanta Jewish Academy was third in 3D modeling among high school juniors and seniors.

“We are so proud that Shaun and Dan can compete with and hold their own against dozens of other students from all around the state,” said Scott Forbus, AJA’s network administrator. “They really epitomize the kind of students that AJA is proud to produce.”

Abby Stein

Abby Stein

Outside the day schools, Yoni Bachar from Druid Hills High School finished third in robotics among ninth- and 10th-graders.

STAR Students Named

Atlanta Jewish Academy and the Weber School in late January announced their STAR students in the Class of 2016: Abby Stein at AJA and Jessica Bachner at Weber.

Under the auspices of the Professional Association of Georgia Educators, the Student Teacher Achievement Recognition program honors the senior at each high school who has the highest SAT score on a single test date and is in the Top 10 in the class (or top 10 percent) based on grade-point average.

Weber School STAR student Jessica Bachner says her STAR teacher pick, Nicole Brite, has helped her fall in love with chemistry.

Weber School STAR student Jessica Bachner says her STAR teacher pick, Nicole Brite, has helped her fall in love with chemistry.

Each STAR student also is asked to name the teacher most influential in her academic development. The selected STAR teachers are math teacher Patsy Cain at AJA and chemistry teacher Nicole Brite at Weber.

“It has been a privilege to see Jessica grow, not only in her love and passion for chemistry, but into a wonderful and caring young lady as well,” Brite said. “I am so very honored that she chose me as her STAR teacher.”

Abby, who scored 2270 on the SAT and has a 4.5 GPA, is co-president of the AJA Student Council, a varsity volleyball player and a primary cast member in musical theater productions.

TIP Fellowship Deadline

Friday, March 25, at 5 p.m. is the deadline for undergraduate and graduate college students to apply for The Israel Project’s Tower Tomorrow Fellowship, an eight-week summer program in writing and media advocacy in Washington, D.C.

Tower Magazine Editor David Hazony leads a writing seminar in which the students write and revise 2,000-word articles on Israel and the Middle East each week, practice short-form journalism, and work on strategic communication and messaging with daily blog posts.

Fellows meet with journalists, scholars and diplomats, work with TIP staff members, and visit institutions such as Congress, the Israeli Embassy and Congress.

At the end of the program, fellows may apply for grants to establish campus publications that rely on the experience and tools gained during the summer.